The Steeping Times Chart

2 CommentsSaturday, 25 April 2020  |  Ken

The Steeping Times Chart

The Steeping Times Chart

The following steeping times chart is to give you an idea of where to start when you prepare your teas. Although not an exact science, you should check with your merchant for instructions for individual teas. However, this chart will help you get started and remember, tea taste is subjective and, therefore, different for everyone, so don't be afraid to experiment.​

 

Western Style Brewing

Type of Tea

Amount of tea per person/cup

Water Temperature

Steeping Times

Possible Infusions

Black Tea

1 heaped tsp

95°C / 203°F

3 minutes

4

Oolong Tea

1 heaped tsp

95°C / 203°F

2 minutes

4

Green Tea

1 heaped tsp

80°C / 175°F

2 minutes

2

White Tea

1 heaped tsp

85°C / 185°F

2 minutes

2

Pu-Erh Tea

1 heaped tsp

95°C / 203°F

2 minutes

6

Rooibos

1 heaped tsp

95°C / 203°F

4-6 minutes

3

Yerba Maté

1 heaped tsp

80°C / 175°F

3-5 minutes

3

Fruit Infusion

1 heaped tsp

95°C / 203°F

4-5 minutes

2

Herbal Tea

1 heaped tsp

95°C / 203°F

4-5 minutes

2

 

If you would like to try a more traditional style of brewing your tea, here are some guidelines to help you get started. The basic idea is to add more tea, shorter steeping times and more infusions. The tea often tastes smoother using this method.

 

Gong Fu STYLE BREWING

Type of Tea

Amount of tea per person/cup

Water Temperature

Steeping Times

Possible Infusions

Black Tea

3 heaped tsp

95°C / 203°F

15 seconds

8

Oolong Tea

3 heaped tsp

95°C / 203°F

20 seconds

9

Green Tea

3 heaped tsp

80°C / 175°F

15 seconds

5

White Tea

3 heaped tsp

85°C / 185°F

20 seconds

5

Pu-Erh Tea

3 heaped tsp

95°C / 203°F

10 seconds

20

 

Temperatures

Here is a tip to help you in achieving the right temperature without the use of a thermometer:

  • 95°C / 203°F – Boiling water
  • 90°C / 195°F – Boil water and let stand for 1-2 minute
  • 80°C / 175°F – Boil water and let stand for 2-4 minutes

The above isn't very scientific, but it's a good guestimate. Just remember the more water you boil, the longer you need to leave it to cool down.

 

A few extra things to consider:

  • Don't over steep green teas or they may taste bitter
  • The longer you steep the first infusion, the fewer times you will be able to re-steep your leaves
  • For a stronger taste, add more tea and use the same steeping times above
  • For Iced Tea, use double the measure of tea and follow the above chart for temperatures and times. Remember, the ice will dilute your drink.
  • To make Iced tea with cold water, double the amount of tea, cover and leave in a fridge for 4 – 10 hours.  

 

What About You?

Do you have a favourite way of brewing tea? Are these charts helpful to you? Please leave me a comment below. Sharing this with friends and family would make me happy too :)
Have a Steeping Time! 


Nigel
Tuesday, 28 April 2020  |  2:08

Thanks for sharing this really useful chart with us, Ken! I never know exactly how long to steep these teas for, but now there's no excuse for getting it wrong :-)
Question... How should we alter the steeping time when doing a re-steep? Is there a rule of thumb for that?


Ken
Tuesday, 28 April 2020  |  2:18

Thank you for your comment, Nigel.
If you are brewing western style, you could add a minute for the second and subsequent infusions. Add just 30 seconds for oolong and Puerh teas.
For Gong-fu style, steep for an additional 5 seconds for each tea.
If you are doing Gangnam Style, put your tea down first, we don't want any accidents!
Have a Steeping Time!